| CV

Curriculum Vita

TERESA LYNCH
brief curriculum vita

3045D Derby Hall, 154 N Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210
phone: (614) 688-2117 | email: lynch.659@osu.edu | web: teresa-lynch.com

| EDUCATION

Ph.D., Mass Communications, 2017
Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
Dissertation: Assessing the Relevance of Formidability on Fear in Playful Simulations of Predation
Advisor: Nicole Martins, Ph.D.
Minor: Psychology

M.A., Telecommunications, 2013
Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
Thesis: Nothing to fear? College students’ fear responses to video games
Advisor: Nicole Martins, Ph.D.

B.A., Music, 2008
Armstrong Atlantic State University, Savannah, GA
Advisor: Stephen Primatic, Ph.D.

| ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

AU 2017 – current
Assistant Professor of Communication Technology
School of Communication, The Ohio State University

FA 2016 – SP 2017
Graduate Scholars Fellow
University Graduate School, Indiana University

FA 2011 – SP 2016
Graduate Assistantship
Dept. of Telecommunications/The Media School, Indiana University 

| RESEARCH INTERESTS

Emotion and video games
Social identity, stereotyping and media
Intergroup processes in video games
Dynamic, complex systems approaches in communication science

| PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS

Read, G. L, Lynch, T., & Matthews, N. L. (accepted for publication). Increased cognitive load during video game play reduces rape myth acceptance and hostile sexism after exposure to sexualized female avatars. Sex Roles. 

Martins, N., Weaver, A. J., & Lynch, T. (accepted for publication). What the public “knows” about media effects research: The influence of news frames on perceived credibility and belief change. Journal of Communication. doi: 10.1093/joc/jqx004

Gonzales, A. L., Kwon, E. Y., Lynch, T., & Fritz, N. (2016). ‘Better everyone should know our business than we lose our house’: Costs and benefits of medical crowdfunding for support, privacy, and identity. New Media & Society, 20, 641-658. doi: 10.1177/1461444816667723 

Lynch, T., Tompkins, J. E., van Driel, I., & Fritz, N. (2016) Sexy, strong, and secondary: An analysis of female videogame characters from 1983 to 2014. Journal of Communication, 66, 564-584. doi: 10.1111/jcom.12237 

Matthews, N. L., Lynch, T., & Martins, N. (2016). Real ideal: Investigating how normal and ideal video game bodies affect men and women. Computers in Human Behavior, 59, 155-164. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.01.026 

Potter, R. F., Jamison-Koenig, E. J., Lynch, T., & Sites, J. (advance online publication 2016) Effect of vocal-pitch difference on automatic attention to voice changes in audio messages. Communication Research. doi: 10.1177/0093650215623835 

Lynch, T. & Martins, N. (2015). Nothing to fear? An analysis of college students’ fear experiences with video games. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 59(2), 298-317. doi: 10.1080/08838151.2015.1029128 

Potter, R. F., Lynch, T., & Kraus, A. (2015). I’ve heard that before: Habituation of the orienting response follows repeated presentation of auditory structural features in radio. Communication Monographs, 82, 359-378. doi: 10.1080/03637751.2015.1019529 

| BOOK CONTRIBUTIONS

Lynch, T. & Matthews, N. L. (2017). Life and death. In S. Jones (Ed.), Avatars, Assembled: The Sociotechnical Anatomy of Digital Bodies. New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing.

Lynch, T. (2017) Validity. In J. Matthes (Ed.), International Encyclopedia of Communication Research Methods. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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